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Ronda by Train

Ronda

The city of Ronda

Ronda is one of the oldest towns in Europe, people have lived in the district for more than 30,000 years, and Ronda has been occupied for 9,000 years. Surrounded by stunning mountains and located on a high plateau, the scenic city of Ronda is separated by the deep El Tajo gorge, with the impressive "Puente Nuevo" bridging its two parts. fantastic hotels, beautiful churches, The famous bullring, museums, tapas bars and coffee shops are easily reached and make up part of this city's charm.

More information about visiting Ronda can be found over at Ronda Today.

Why visit Ronda?

  • Discover a city that has welcomed a large number of international personalities, artists and writers such as Ernest Hemingway, Alexandre Dumas, David Wilkie, Madonna, or Jamie Oliver.
  • Located closed to three natural parks with many endemic species.
  • Ronda is the perfect base to explore other cities such as Seville, Granada, Cordoba, Jerez de la Frontera, Cadiz, Antequera, or Malaga.

Rail Passes for travel in Spain

Eurail Spain Pass
Eurail France - Spain Pass
Eurail Italy - Spain Pass
Eurail Portugal - Spain Pass
Eurail Select Pass
Eurail Global Pass
Renfe Spain Pass

Some top attractions in Ronda

If you're planning to visit Ronda here are the top things to do to help you enjoy your holiday. Ronda is a small city, and almost everything is within 500m of the Puento Nuevo bridge.

The Bullring (Plaza de Toros), considered to be the most historically important bullring in Spain, and home to the Ronda style with a matador on foot instead of horseback. The building can only seat 5000 people but has the largest central sand surface, known as the rueda, in the world. The structure is entirely built from locally quarried stone, then plastered and whitewashed.

The New Bridge (Puente Nuevo), the largest of Ronda's several bridges that cross the impressive Tajo gorge that separates the city in two. The bridge is 98 meters tall with a tall central arch, and a room under the road that has been a hotel, a bar, a prison, and is now a small museum.

The Arab Baths are considered the most complete in Spain even though they are ruins, and offer a tantalizing glimpse into medievel Islamic times. Visitors are able to see the pump tower on which a donkey turned a crank that fed cold water to the baths. The water was heated and distributed in three rooms, a hot room for sweating out impurities, a warm room for massages and soaking, and a cold room to cool down.

The Mondragon Palace is a 13th century palace that archeologists believe was the home of Ronda's Islamic King Abomelik when Ronda was the capital city of a large kingdom in Al-Andalus. The palace is home to the city museum with displays from the paleolithic, neolithic, Roman, Moorish, and Christian eras.

The medieval walls, with numerous gates and Islamic arches, high defensive towers and long stretches of impregnable stone wall that surround the old city and would take at least an hour to walk around. The most impressive sections are located at Almocabar in the Barrio San Francisco, Calle Goleta, and near the ruined flour mills in the Tajo gorge.

The Water Mine, a dark and scary escent to the Islamic era fortress carved into the gorge below the Casa del Rey Moro. Known as the Water Mine because for hundreds of years it operated as the only source of water into the city, with slaves chained to the steps to pass water bags upwards.

Visit the Santa Maria la Mayor church to see Ronda's largest church, and also home to many of the Easter floats used in processions during Holy Week. The church was built on the foundations of an Islamic mosque, part of which is still visible in a small alcove as you enter.

Walk to the bottom of the El Tajo gorge, though not for the faint hearted because this is a steep descent but completely worth it, to get that perfect photo of the bridge. Follow Calle Tenorio to the end and after the plaza take the walking track to the old Arab gate. If you wish, you can go through the gate and walk down and then under the Puente Nuevo.

Enjoy local tapas at one of the many outdoor bars in Ronda, with popular places being Plaza Socorro, Calle Nuevo, the Plaza in front of the Almocabar Gate, or Plaza Duquesa de Parcent.

Stroll through the old town at sunset as the tourists leave and Rondeños reclaim their city. This is the time when the real Ronda comes alive, with children playing in the plazas, families preparing their evening meal, and the sites and smells change completely.